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tips:rma_vs_lm_lme_lmer

A Comparison of the rma() and the lm(), lme(), and lmer() Functions

In essence, the commonly used meta-analytic models are just special cases of the linear (mixed-effects) model with the only peculiar aspect that the variances of the error terms (i.e., the sampling variances) are known. Not surprisingly, the question therefore comes up occasionally why one cannot use the lm(), lme(), and lmer() functions for conducting meta-analyses. After all, the functions can be used to fit linear (mixed-effects) models and both functions allow the user to specify the sampling variances via the weights argument. So it seems that one should also be able to fit meta-analytic models with these functions. Below, I describe and illustrate how the models fitted via the lm(), lme(), and lmer() functions differ from the models fitted by the rma() function and why the those functions are therefore not suitable for fitting meta-analytic models.

Fixed-Effects Model

Let's start with a fixed-effects model. As an example, consider the data from the meta-analysis by Molloy et al. (2014) on the relationship between conscientiousness and medication adherence. For each study, we can compute the r-to-z transformed correlation coefficient and corresponding sampling variance with:

library(metafor)
dat <- escalc(measure="ZCOR", ri=ri, ni=ni, data=dat.molloy2014)
dat[,-c(5:10)]
               authors year  ni     ri      yi     vi
1      Axelsson et al. 2009 109  0.187  0.1892 0.0094
2      Axelsson et al. 2011 749  0.162  0.1634 0.0013
3         Bruce et al. 2010  55  0.340  0.3541 0.0192
4   Christensen et al. 1999 107  0.320  0.3316 0.0096
5  Christensen & Smith 1995  72  0.270  0.2769 0.0145
6         Cohen et al. 2004  65  0.000  0.0000 0.0161
7       Dobbels et al. 2005 174  0.175  0.1768 0.0058
8        Ediger et al. 2007 326  0.050  0.0500 0.0031
9         Insel et al. 2006  58  0.260  0.2661 0.0182
10       Jerant et al. 2011 771  0.010  0.0100 0.0013
11        Moran et al. 1997  56 -0.090 -0.0902 0.0189
12   O'Cleirigh et al. 2007  91  0.370  0.3884 0.0114
13       Penedo et al. 2003 116  0.000  0.0000 0.0088
14        Quine et al. 2012 537  0.150  0.1511 0.0019
15      Stilley et al. 2004 158  0.240  0.2448 0.0065
16 Wiebe & Christensen 1997  65  0.040  0.0400 0.0161

The yi values are the r-to-z transformed correlations and the vi values the corresponding sampling variances.

We can now fit a fixed-effects model to these data with:

res.fe <- rma(yi, vi, data=dat, method="FE")
res.fe
Fixed-Effects Model (k = 16)
 
Test for Heterogeneity: 
Q(df = 15) = 38.1595, p-val = 0.0009
 
Model Results:
 
estimate       se     zval     pval    ci.lb    ci.ub          
  0.1252   0.0170   7.3642   <.0001   0.0919   0.1585      *** 
 
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

Now let's try to fit the same model with the lm() function by specifying the inverse of the sampling variances as weights:

res.lm <- lm(yi ~ 1, weights = 1/vi, data=dat)
summary(res.lm)
Call:
lm(formula = yi ~ 1, data = dat, weights = 1/vi)
 
Weighted Residuals:
    Min      1Q  Median      3Q     Max 
-3.1919 -1.0719  0.6674  1.3173  2.4695 
 
Coefficients:
            Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
(Intercept)  0.12518    0.02711   4.617 0.000335 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1
 
Residual standard error: 1.595 on 15 degrees of freedom

Two things are of note here:

  1. The estimated intercept (0.12518) is exactly the same as the model coefficient obtained earlier with the rma() function (the value reported by the rma() function is rounded to 4 decimals, but that can be changed with print(res.fe, digits=5) yielding the same value).
  2. The standard error (of the estimated intercept) is different (and hence, the test statistic and p-value also differs).

The reason for this discrepancy is that the model fitted by the lm() function assumes that the weights are not exactly known, but only up to a proportionality constant (namely $\sigma^2_e$, that is, the error or residual variance), which is estimated and then factored into the weights.

This can be demonstrated by extracting the estimated error variance from the lm object, multiplying the sampling variances by that value, and re-fitting the model with the rma() function:

rma(yi, vi*summary(res.lm)$sigma^2, data=dat, method="FE")
Fixed-Effects Model (k = 16)
 
Test for Heterogeneity: 
Q(df = 15) = 15.0000, p-val = 0.4514
 
Model Results:
 
estimate       se     zval     pval    ci.lb    ci.ub          
  0.1252   0.0271   4.6171   <.0001   0.0720   0.1783      *** 
 
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

Now these results are exactly the same as those obtained by the lm() function. Note that multiplying the sampling variances by some constant value does not affect the model estimate, but only the corresponding standard error.

Therefore, if we want to obtain the same standard error from lm() as from rma(), we must adjust the standard error by $\hat{\sigma}_e$ (i.e., the square-root of the estimated error variance or what is called the "residual standard error" in the output from the lm() function):

coef(summary(res.fe))
   estimate         se     zval         pval      ci.lb     ci.ub
1 0.1251767 0.01699805 7.364176 1.782441e-13 0.09186109 0.1584922
coef(summary(res.lm))[1,2] / summary(res.lm)$sigma
[1] 0.01699805

Random-Effects Model

A random-effects model can be fitted to the same data using the rma() function with:

res.re <- rma(yi, vi, data=dat)
res.re
Random-Effects Model (k = 16; tau^2 estimator: REML)
 
tau^2 (estimated amount of total heterogeneity): 0.0081 (SE = 0.0055)
tau (square root of estimated tau^2 value):      0.0901
I^2 (total heterogeneity / total variability):   61.73%
H^2 (total variability / sampling variability):  2.61
 
Test for Heterogeneity: 
Q(df = 15) = 38.1595, p-val = 0.0009
 
Model Results:
 
estimate       se     zval     pval    ci.lb    ci.ub          
  0.1499   0.0316   4.7501   <.0001   0.0881   0.2118      *** 
 
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

Now let's try to fit the same model with the lme() function from the nlme package. Here, the weights argument is used to specify a variance function with fixed variances (note: the name of the weights argument is a bit of a misnomer for the lme() function, as one does not use it to specify the weights – as in the lm() function – but a variance function structure). In addition, we need to add the random effects for each study via the random argument.

library(nlme)
dat$study <- 1:nrow(dat)
res.lme <- lme(yi ~ 1, random = ~ 1 | study, weights = varFixed(~ vi), data=dat)
summary(res.lme)
Linear mixed-effects model fit by REML
 Data: dat 
        AIC       BIC   logLik
  -8.781569 -6.657418 7.390784
 
Random effects:
 Formula: ~1 | study
        (Intercept) Residual
StdDev:  0.06818354 1.259548
 
Variance function:
 Structure: fixed weights
 Formula: ~vi 
Fixed effects: yi ~ 1 
                Value  Std.Error DF  t-value p-value
(Intercept) 0.1415557 0.03071906 16 4.608073   3e-04
 
Standardized Within-Group Residuals:
       Min         Q1        Med         Q3        Max 
-1.1596768 -0.6903414  0.1964221  0.7117538  1.4616798 
 
Number of Observations: 16
Number of Groups: 16

Alternatively, we could use the lmer() function from the lme4 package. The syntax would be:

library(lme4)
res.lmer <- lmer(yi ~ 1 + (1 | study), weights = 1/vi, data=dat, 
                 control=lmerControl(check.nobs.vs.nlev="ignore", check.nobs.vs.nRE="ignore"))
summary(res.lmer)
Linear mixed model fit by REML ['lmerMod']
Formula: yi ~ 1 + (1 | study)
   Data: dat
Weights: 1/vi
Control: 
lmerControl(check.nobs.vs.nlev = "ignore", check.nobs.vs.nRE = "ignore")
 
REML criterion at convergence: -14.8
 
Scaled residuals: 
    Min      1Q  Median      3Q     Max 
-1.1597 -0.6903  0.1964  0.7117  1.4617 
 
Random effects:
 Groups   Name        Variance Std.Dev.
 study    (Intercept) 0.004649 0.06818 
 Residual             1.586461 1.25955 
Number of obs: 16, groups:  study, 16
 
Fixed effects:
            Estimate Std. Error t value
(Intercept)  0.14156    0.03072   4.608

Note that some of the default checks need to be switched off before lmer() will go through with fitting this model.

A couple things are of note here:

  1. The estimated intercept differs from the model coefficient obtained earlier with the rma() function.
  2. The standard error is also different (and hence, the test statistic and p-value also differs).
  3. The estimated standard deviation of the random effects also differs (0.0682 for lme() and lmer() compared to 0.0901 for rma()).

These discrepancies are due to the exact same reason described earlier. The lme() and lmer() functions assume that the sampling variances are not exactly known, but again just up to a proportionality constant, namely the residual variance.

To illustrate this, we can again factor in that constant into the sampling variances and refit the model with rma():

rma(yi, vi*res.lme$sigma^2, data=dat)
Random-Effects Model (k = 16; tau^2 estimator: REML)
 
tau^2 (estimated amount of total heterogeneity): 0.0046 (SE = 0.0049)
tau (square root of estimated tau^2 value):      0.0682
I^2 (total heterogeneity / total variability):   36.82%
H^2 (total variability / sampling variability):  1.58
 
Test for Heterogeneity: 
Q(df = 15) = 24.0532, p-val = 0.0642
 
Model Results:
 
estimate       se     zval     pval    ci.lb    ci.ub          
  0.1416   0.0307   4.6081   <.0001   0.0813   0.2018      *** 
 
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

Now these results match exactly what was obtained with the lme() function.

In terms of the underlying models, we can also easily describe the difference as follows. The underlying model fitted by the rma() function is: $$y_i = \mu + u_i + e_i,$$ where $u_i \sim N(0, \tau^2)$ and $e_i \sim N(0, v_i)$, where the $v_i$ values are the known sampling variances. On the other hand, the model fitted by the lme() and lmer() functions is: $$y_i = \mu + u_i + e_i,$$ where $u_i \sim N(0, \tau^2)$ and $e_i \sim N(0, \sigma^2_e v_i)$, where $\sigma^2_e$ is that proportionality constant.

Meta-Regression

The examples above show models without any covariates/predictors/moderators (i.e., the models only include an intercept term). However, the exact same discrepancy will be found when including covariates into the models. In this context, Thompson and Sharp (1999) also describe the difference discussed above. They denote the model fitted by lm() as a model that accounts for potential heterogeneity by a multiplicative factor (i.e., the residual variance), while the random-effects model fitted via the rma() function is a model that accounts for potential heterogeneity by an additive factor. They note that the "rationale for using a multiplicative factor for variance inflation is weak" (p. 2705) and clearly recommend to use a model with an additive heterogeneity component.

The possibility of using both an additive and multiplicative component simultaneously was not discussed by Thompson and Sharp (1999). This is in fact what the model fitted with the lme() function does. However, as far as I am aware of, no motivation supporting such a model has ever been given. In fact, it is my impression that those who use the lme() and lmer() functions for meta-analytic purposes are typically not aware of the issues discussed above.

More Complex Models

Note that the same issues apply when fitting more complex meta-analytic models (e.g., multivariate/multilevel models). The rma.mv() function in the metafor package can be used to fit such models (see the analysis examples section for some illustrations). Using the lme() and lmer() functions to fit such models will again lead to a mix of additive and multiplicative variance components, which is not how multivariate/multilevel meta-analytic models are typically defined.

S-Plus Version of lme()

The nlme package was developed by José Pinheiro and Douglas Bates for both R and S-Plus. Interestingly, the S-Plus version has a special control argument that allows the user to set the error variance to a fixed constant. By setting this to 1, one can fit the exact same model as the rma() does:

res.lme <- lme(yi ~ 1, random = ~ 1 | study, weights = varFixed(~ vi), control=lmeControl(sigma = 1), data=dat)
summary(res.lme)
Linear mixed-effects model fit by REML
 Data: dat 
        AIC      BIC   logLik 
  -10.44653 -9.03043 7.223265
 
Random effects:
 Formula:  ~ 1 | study
        (Intercept) Residual 
StdDev:  0.09005302        1
 
Variance function:
 Structure: fixed weights
 Formula:  ~ vi 
Fixed effects: yi ~ 1 
                Value  Std.Error DF  t-value p-value 
(Intercept) 0.1499171 0.03155994 16 4.750234  0.0002
 
Standardized Within-Group Residuals:
       Min         Q1        Med        Q3      Max 
 -1.222824 -0.5462851 0.09989517 0.6159687 1.305632
 
Number of Observations: 16
Number of Groups: 16

These are the exact same results as obtained earlier with the rma() function. Unfortunately, the R version of the nlme package does not provide this functionality.

Update: The R version of the nlme package does allow the use of the lmeControl(sigma = 1) control argument (this was added in version 3.1-123, which was released 2016-01-17). However, using this does not yield the same results as obtained above (the results are close but not the same). The results given above have also been compared to those obtained with Stata (metareg command) and SAS (proc mixed) and are definitely correct. This issue has also been raised on the R-sig-ME mailing list (see here).

Summary

The models fitted by the rma() function assume that the sampling variances are known. The models fitted by the lm(), lme(), and lmer() functions assume that the sampling variances are known only up to a proportionality constant. These are different models than typically used in meta-analyses.

References

Molloy, G. J., O'Carroll, R. E., & Ferguson, E. (2014). Conscientiousness and medication adherence: A meta-analysis. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 47(1), 92–101.

Thompson, S. G., & Sharp, S. J. (1999). Explaining heterogeneity in meta-analysis: A comparison of methods. Statistics in Medicine, 18(20), 2693–2708.

tips/rma_vs_lm_lme_lmer.txt · Last modified: 2016/07/01 17:25 by Wolfgang Viechtbauer